Who are the experts?Our certified Educators are real professors, teachers, and scholars who use their academic expertise to tackle your toughest questions. Log in here. Our summaries and analyses are written by experts, and your questions are answered by real teachers. Keywords: Jacques Derrida, plural logic of the aporia, deconstruction, Sigmund Freud, Richard Rorty, différance, economic aporia, aneconomic aporia Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. [40] He insists that meaning is made possible by the relations of a word to other words within the network of structures that language is. Jacques Derrida was a key philosopher of modern times who made pioneering explorations into the subtexts of our key concepts. Originating in the Greek, aporia Derrida called his critique of philosophy a “grammatology,” not in reference to grammar, but as a play ... scandal, and aporia. a difficulty encountered in … Allen, Graham. impassable. ae [uh-pawr-ee-ee, uh-pohr-]. Regardless, if the Marxist philosophical tradition was, as Derrida suggested, exceptionally invested in the theory/practice metaphysical dualism, then the remainder of Derrida… Derrida was born on July 15, 1930 in El-Biar (a suburb of Algiers),Algeria (then a part of France), into a Sephardic Jewishfamily. B.A. Effectively, Derrida is saying that aporia is a situation where the very elements that make a thing possible are simultaneously the same ones that make the thing impossible. As soon as it is deconstructed, it becomes impossible. In any binary set of terms, the second can be argued to exist in order to fill in an originary lack in the first. from University of Oxford M.A. In particular, Derrida has described the paradoxes that afflict notions like giving, hospitality, forgiving and mourning. It can also denote the state of being perplexed, or at a loss, at such a puzzle or impasse. A Greek term denoting a logical contradiction, “aporia” is used by Derrida to refer to what he often calls the “blind spots” of any metaphysical argument.” contradiction, “aporia” is used by Derrida to refer to what he Logic, Philosophy. Derrida has recently become more and more preoccupied with what has come to be termed \"possible-impossible aporias\" - aporia was originally a Greek term meaning puzzle, but it has come to mean something more like an impasse or paradox. The concept of aporia in Derrida's writings, and that of subsequent deconstructivists, is fairly complex. noun In rhetoric, a professed doubt where to begin or what to say on account of the variety of matter. significantly and frequently in the writings of the French ], If you need to create a new bookshelf to save this article in, please make sure that you are logged in, then go to your 'Account' here, [https://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1578, accessed 01 December 2020.]. a paradox). That is what we mean when we say that Derrida is a post-structuralist; he is abandoning the structuralist approach to knowledge as traditionally understood. Aporia (Ancient Greek: ἀπορία: impasse; lack of resources; puzzlement; doubt; confusion) denotes, in philosophy, a philosophical puzzle or state of puzzlement, and, in rhetoric, a rhetorically useful expression of doubt. The logic of undecidability for the gift -- or the logic of aporia, another Derridean "logic" -- is the following. from The Century Dictionary. Niall Lucy, in his A Derrida Dictionary (Blackwell: 2004), opens his entry on aporia with this definition: “aporia. from University of Oxford Ph.D. from University of Leicester, Top subjects are Literature, History, and Law and Politics. Dictionary (Blackwell: 2004), opens his entry on aporia with This question expresses doubt or confusion and more often than not appears as a rhetorical question. Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Derrida’s Concept of Differance By Nasrullah Mambrol on March 22, 2016 • ( 2). It's the point at which the text has hit a brick wall when it comes to meaning. A figure of speech in which the speaker expresses or purports to be in doubt about a question. © The Literary Dictionary Company Limited. First the idea of aporia as the impossible (in § 1: Finis) along with Heidegger's definition of "death" as `the possibility of the pure and simple impossibility for Dasein' (p. 23). In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves. Originating in the Greek, aporia involves doubt, perplexity and that which is impassable. In philosophy, an aporia is a philosophical puzzle or a seemingly insoluble impasse in an inquiry, often arising as a result of equally plausible yet inconsistent premises (i.e. It has contradicted itself one too many times, and now it's at an impasse. How you could link "différance," the literary theory of Derrida, with literature to show the function of différance? The adjective is aporetic . 1 Definitions 2 Etymology 3 Philosophy 4 Rhetoric 5 See also 6 References Definitions of the term aporia have varied throughout history. What does APORIA mean? A Greek term denoting a logical CFP - Post-1945 Women's Writing (British and American), CFP - Scandinavian (Nordic) Literatures and Cultures, CFP - Hispanic South and Central American Literatures and Cultures, CFP - Nineteenth Century French Literature and Culture, CFP - Arabic/ Middle Eastern (incl. Already a member? What does Derrida argue in his essay "Plato's Pharmacy?". ©2020 eNotes.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2. Hospitality, for example, is logically impossible because in order to be hospitable, one must own the property and means to use for hosting, which thus puts the host in a position of power over his guests. To counter the pervasiveness of the ‘metaphysics of presence’ in Western Philosophy – Derrida uses the neologism ‘Differance’ – a playful combination of ‘differ’ and ‘to defer’, to demonstrate that the meaning of a linguistic sign is the simultaneous operation of distinction and temporality. The words aporia and aporetic figure The notion of an aporia is principally found in Greek philosophy, but it also plays a role in post-structuralist philosophy, as in the writings of Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, and it has also served as an instrument of investigation in analytic p… The concept of aporia in Derrida's writings, and that of subsequent deconstructivists, is fairly complex. definition is useful, especially in alerting us t…, Citation: Incidences of aporia leave us in a sort of Schroedinger's Box situation wherein a concept can only exist if we do not examine it too closely from any angle. If he is not in some way controlling his guests, this suggests that the guests are abusing his hospitality by... (The entire section contains 4 answers and 728 words.). eNotes.com will help you with any book or any question. And to expand on this, Derrida explores two issues. A gift cannot be recognized, or it’s just the opening gambit in an economic exchange, an investment to be capitalized upon in thanks or a counter-gift or even just self-congratulations. Top subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences, Top subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and Business, Top subjects are Literature, Arts, and Science. Derrida, in his work "Differance," has used many binary oppositions to explain his work "Differance." Aporia suggests “an impasse”, a knot or an inherent contradiction found in any text, an insuperable deadlock, or “double bind” of incompatible or contradictory meanings which are … Derrida says an aporia is a “non-road,” an inability to traverse the space between two things. "Aporia". 1. For the last thirty years, Derrida has repeatedly, in various contexts and various ways, broached the question of aporia. In classical rhetoric , aporia means placing a claim in doubt by developing arguments on both sides of an issue. Derrida refers to this point as an "aporia" in the text; thus, deconstructive reading is termed "aporetic." Aporia is a figure of speech in which the speaker expresses real or simulated doubt or perplexity. Please cite all the binary oppositions to... What are some of Jacques Derrida's points in "Structure, Sign, and Play"? [1] Of Of Grammatology, p.49. He argues that the condition of their possibility is also, and at once, the condition of their impossibility. Derrida argues that what is complete in itself cannot be added to, and so a supplement can only occur where there is an originary lack. the expression of a simulated or real doubt, as about where to begin or what to do or say. often calls the “blind spots” of any metaphysical argument.” The First published 20 July 2005 [https://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1578, accessed 01 December 2020. … Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. What's the definition of the idea of "play" as developed by Jacques Derrida? this definition: “aporia. 2. An insoluble contradiction or paradox in a text's meanings. Educators go through a rigorous application process, and every answer they submit is reviewed by our in-house editorial team. Rhetoric. Jewish)/ North African/ Diasporic Arab Literature and Culture. So, for instance inMonolingualism of the Other(1998), Derrida recounts how,when he was in the “lycée” (high school), the Vichyregime in France proclaimed certain interdictions concerning thenative languages of Algeria, in particular Berber. The Literary Encyclopedia. There are, according to Derrida, a number of social concepts and situations that are sustained only by the internal tension wherein nobody actually acknowledges that they do not make sense at all. noun A figure of speech in which the speaker expresses or purports to be in doubt about a question. An insoluble contradiction or paradox in a text's meanings. Niall Lucy, in his A Derrida philosopher Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) and in the deconstructive ISSN 1747-678X. “There is no justice without this experience, however impossible it may be, of aporia,” he says. Derrida has recently become more and more preoccupied with what has come to be termed "possible-impossible aporias" - aporia was originally a Greek term meaning a philosophical puzzle or state of puzzlement and in rhetoric a rhetorically useful expression of doubt, but it has come to mean something more like an impasse or paradox. school of literary and cultural theory which his work inspired. The concept was first outlined by Derrida in Of Grammatology where he explored the interplay between language and the construction of meaning. What are good questions for a class discussion? This demonstration is to show that any meaning constructed in language is not fixed but ‘disseminated’ and cannot be located within a specific core or essence. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime. Aporia plays a big part in the work of deconstruction theorists like Jacques Derrida, who use the term to describe a text's most doubtful or contradictory moment. Give examples from literature,... What were some of Jacques Derrida's ideas about literature. In William Harmon’s A Handbook to Literature, for example, aporia is identified as “a difficulty, impasse, or point of doubt and indecision” while also noting that critics such as Derrida have employed the term to “indicate a point of undecidability, which locates the site at which the text most obviously undermines its own rhetorical structure, dismantles, or deconstructs itself” (39). http://www.theaudiopedia.com What is APORIA? noun An insoluble contradiction or paradox in a text's meanings. Deconstruction by its very nature defies institutionalization in an authoritative definition. What does Derrida say about structure, sign, and play in his essay "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences?". What is the deconstruction theory attributed to Derrida? involves doubt, perplexity and that which is 1 : an expression of real or pretended doubt or uncertainty especially for rhetorical effect. Other articles where Logocentrism is discussed: deconstruction: Deconstruction in philosophy: …a manifestation of the “logocentrism” of Western culture—i.e., the general assumption that there is a realm of “truth” existing prior to and independent of its representation by linguistic signs. 2 : a logical impasse or contradiction especially : a radical contradiction in the import of a text or theory that … Aporia is a figure of speech where a speaker or writer poses a question. In On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, Jacques Derrida argues that according to its own internal logic, genuine forgiving must involve the impossible: that is, the forgiving of an ‘unforgivable’ transgression.According to him, the definition of ‘forgiveness’ is to forgive the unforgivable, and by its definition, ‘unforgivable’ is someone who cannot be forgiven. It is usually in regards to what characters, or people in general, should do in one situation. A figure of speech in which the speaker expresses or purports to be in doubt about a question. Because Derrida’s writing concerns auto-bio-graphy(writing about one’s life as a form of relation to oneself),many of his writings are auto-biographical. 1. Thus the word "death" whose concept is `unassignable or unassigning' (p. 22).