1/4"-3/8" high bevel, a flat spine and fully hardened blade (4 3/4" handle). This leaves a lot of material behind the edge, strengthening it. Do they sharpen pretty easy? A close second would be a flat grind or asymetrical grind such as the Bark River Bravos offer. Having that bit of extra spine weight increases your ability to drive the edge forward. As the name suggests, the Scandi grind originated from Scandinavia. Anything closer to a 1/2 height grind is no longer considered a flat but has become a saber grind. ENZO of Finland. etc. Okay I'm out. Bob_Spr Supporter. It is the compromise between flat and scandi. This can also be sabre ground - but the shorter the grind - the more like a scandi it becomes. I wish I had dime for every time some idiot on YouTube said that scandi knives are easier to sharpen without elaborating. Full flat with a convex secondary bevel is my fav. The Scandi and High Flat Grinds are also the recommended grinds … Sharpening the Scandi grind. A quick field test of two popular knife grinds. It's a worse wood splitter. That means I carry it more often. The scandi (which is a zero grind flat saber grind) is sharpened by laying the main bevel flat on the stone, which sounds easier than it really is. It is available in various designs such as the flat grind, Scandi grind, chisel grind, and convex grind. Christ. Nothing too scientific just some head to head testing of some of my favorite bushcraft blades! "scandi" grinds (I really dislike the term "scandi grind", it's incredibly misleading and never really existed before "bushcrafters" popularised it. 3. You must log in or register to reply here. Find out in this video. Flat grind. Full Flat. Many of the Scandinavian blades seem to have a secondary bevel. Hollow grinds can be drop-dead gorgeous and testify to an enormous amount of production skills. Scandinavian or Scandi Grind: Arguably, the most traditional bushcraft knife blade grind. I wonder if Scandi grinds, or sabre or bevel grinds (as with satin finishes), aren't simply a case of the manufacturer oriiginally supplying a product that was easier and cheaper to make. Scandinavian Grind (aka V Grind) The Scandinavian, also known as the V Grind, is the third type of flat grind. Chisel Grind . Most likely it was a conversation between two flintknappers sitting around a cave—and the battle of which grind is the best rages on to this day. Any suggestions for a quality scandi knife 4 to 5 inch blade. Enzo Trapper: Scandi vs Flat grind. Who knows when the first argument over the best blade grind started? I see I wasn't very clear. Inertia is your friend: Another benefit of a Scandi grind is that you can achieve a thin edge and, unlike with a full flat grind, you maintain the blade weight of a saber grind. Depending on the primary bevel’s angle, the cutting edge of a Scandi Grind could be thin and weak or relatively broad and strong. You don't need anything other than a small diamond stone to keep them up in the field for extended periods of time - no special honing blocks with four different grits of sandpaper, mousepads, etc. In the same price rangeas the trapper? Grind- There are tons of grinds available, but the two top choices are Scandi and Scandivex grinds. They are definitely my favorite knife grind and I think almost all outdoors instructors can agree for woodworking and campcraft, the scandi grind cannot be beaten for general use. Based on absolutely no facts or geometry or bevel. A full flat grind goes from the spine of the blade to the edge. I know that a lot of folks like scandis for bushcrafting, what knife/grind do you prefer for bushcrafting tasks? I am a part time knifemaker and I am making this as a bushcrafting knife for a customer. Anything bigger than a Mora I would go flat grind every time. Tend to disagree Templar, the Scandis are fine if they are Mora sized but for a a knife that will be doing many different tasks I would go flat grind, but that is … THIS IS MY HUMBLE OPINION!!!! A saber grind falls somewhere in between a flat grind and Scandi grind. Whittle Talk (Scandi vs Flat) - Duration: 12:09. The Prepared Wanderer 21,773 views. For a "do everything knife" I'd pick a flat grind. The scandinavian grind edge is common with Mora bushcraft knives. The image above shows the shape of a scandinavian grind knife edge. Enzo Bushcraft Knives with different blade grind and handle material. Right on, nothing like a razor axe grind! My hunting/skinning knife is a saber grind (Becker BK5) and my butchering knife is a flat grind (OKC Old Hickory Butcher). If the grind makes the cutting edge extremely thin, your blade’s strength is significantly reduced. Convex guy myself, but that's a beauty regardless of the grind. T o sharpen the Scandi grind by hand, place the bevel flat to the sharpening stone and work on the whole edge. Scandi // Sabre // V-Grind. Flat Grind: A zero bevel made from spine to tip. I actually bought my Paramilitary with food prep in mind. Straight from the shop!!! I like a flat grind on thicker blades. A Chisel Grind looks like you might expect: one side is completely flat—from the spine to the edge—and the other side has a single bevel that starts around the middle of the blade. The primary bevel continues to become the cutting edge, with no deviation or angle change. Its just the oposite actualy, scandis have less material to suport the edge, and will chip or roll more easily than a standard full flat grind which has a secondary bevel. In fact, the Scandi grind is one huge secondary edge, minus any extra frills like curves or scallops seen in other knives. Loading... Unsubscribe from SC bushcraft backwoods? Sent from my SM-A705FN using Tapatalk Apologies! If I was a knife I’d want that to grind on me. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. Flat Grind VS Scandi Grind Published September 16, 2014 at 640 × 394 in A Bushcraft Knife Guide. The flat grind doesn't suck at anything, but it's not ideal for anything either. The flat secondary grind improves cutting in most materials but on wood carving the single bevel scandi has an edge due to increased control. I have a simple question for everyone. A 3/4 flat grind would be from the secondary bevel to 3/4 of the way up the knife which would leave a 90* handle on the spine. For the past week or so I have been trying to decide on a bushcraft knife and after watching all the videos and reading all the blogs,I still can't figure out which grind to go with.Now we seem to have a Saber grind,a full flat grind,scandi grind and a convex grind etc. However, past 1/8" thick a flat grind wins everytime. The Scandi grind is practical in that you can sharpen it with ease and it’s easy to produce. I like and use both, but prefer the flat grind. A high saber grind is okay for me but I find they don't cut great if they are too obtuse and they dont carve like scandis. The kind of grind that a bushcraft knife has can change the blade’s whole dynamic, so the blade grind has to be both versatile and strong. Jul 9, 2015 #1 Hi, Im very interested in the Enzo Trappers in n690 and was wondering what grind ( scandi or flat) you guys think would be better for bushcraft tasks. Flat Grind . A true Scandi Grind doesn’t have a secondary bevel. If they are made from the same thickness of stock, a Scandi grind is full thickness about halfway down the blade, whereas full flat grind begins to thin out immediately below the spine. Little bit of everything doesn't hurt, only thing you're missing is a hollow grind , I like flat and convex the best. Once again another thread on bcuk ruined. The scandi doesn’t begin tapering… Scandi seems like a internet fad. For bushcraft knives, the grind should make the blade both strong and versatile, but it also must be easy enough to sharpen in the field. LT usually labels them as high saber. A full flat grind can also be called a high flat grind. A Scandi grind could be considered the opposite of a flat grind. Sorry could you repeat what you mean about feather sticking? JavaScript is disabled. I have a simple question for everyone. But on the other hand, full flat grind is obviously thinner, so it's a more efficient slicer. No, it has a secondary bevel however the grind goes all the way from the secondary bevel to the spine. They are durable and have a … Scandi for wood carving, flat for slicing food, with me this is inviolable. For strict wood carving/ bushcraft work I use a scandi (Mora Classic 1, or Garberg). You will commonly see full flat grinds labeled FFG. LT Wright Knives Next Gen: Scandi vs. Full Flat Grind SC bushcraft backwoods. "Nordic Grind" Scandi-Bushcraft in Desert Ironwood Burl; This knife is a true-to-form Scandi-Bushcrafter. A great fixed blade knife for bushcraft. ... Bushcraft Carbon Black Scandi Grind Knife. Blade: 1/8″ carbon steel hardened to HRC 56-58 Blade length: 4.3 inches Total length: 9.1 inches Weight w/sheath: 5.7 oz. Scandi without hesitation. Scandi's are notorious for...oh, hell I just think flat ground knives look better. Both are great grinds and I've owned both, but out of the two, I lean toward a high flat grind or full flat grind. My food knife/ pocket knife is a flat grind as well (SAK Tinkerer). Stunning on an EDC or a gentleman’s knife. Easier to hold the angle that is. What it is: A flat grind is a single, symmetric V-bevel -- the blade tapers from a particular height on the blade and ends at the cutting edge.A flat grind that begins at the blade's spine is called a "full flat grind"; a "saber grind" begins its bevel lower on the blade; and a Scandinavian (or "Scandi") grind … A scandi grind (or V grind) (also called a scandinavian grind) is a knife edge with a wide flat bevel that runs to the edge of the blade. The scandi grind is actually perfect if you want to learn how to sharpen your knives on sharpening stones. Since the bevel on scandi grind knives is so large and flat it is pretty easy to get the right angle for sharpening. The difference is the grind starts near the midline of the blade on a saber and above the midline on a high saber. Unlike the High Flat Grind, the Scandi doesn't begin tapering until closer to the edge. One example of a Scandi Grind is found on the Mora Bushcraft. Just one grind from spine to edge? In many instances, a Scandi grind can be preferable because it makes for a great wood carving knife and is easy to sharpen. A scandi grind (or V grind) (also called a scandinavian grind) is a knife edge with a wide flat bevel that runs to the edge of the blade. It's a worse wood splitter. The Scandinavian grind, or Scandi grind, is a short flat (occasionally convex) grind on a thin blade where the primary grind is also the edge bevel. I go for the thin flat grind for fine skinning tasks. With Scandi (Sabre) blades the grind will start below the midway point, towards the edge. As for zero-ground vs. secondary bevel, it's much the same, just in smaller scale. The blade grind is the cross-sectional shape of the edge of the blade, and when it comes to the best knife for bushcraft purposes, it has to have a robust and versatile blade grind. A close second would be a flat grind or asymetrical grind such as the Bark River Bravos offer. A decently flat rock from a river or stream will give you a really good working edge. So if you are a noob I'd say go with a scandi it will teach you how to maintain an edge. I can suggest a few YouTube channels to get you started: Gough Customs, Simple Little Life, Walter Sorrells. Any old kind as long as it's decent. If you prefer a scandi, go on with your bad self. Regardless, the point I was trying to make is that as the thickness of the blade increases, so does the grind height for a given angle and therefore my "ideal scandi" in 2mm is a full flat grind at 1/4" with identical primary bevel angles, identical secondary bevels/microbevels depending on how you sharpen it and identical edge toughness. Just over 8 1/2" overall of 1095 high carbon steel forged from 5/32" stock with an approx. Scandi grind. Sabre Grind – (AKA “zero sabre grind” or “scandi”, short for “Scandanavian” grind) – The sabre is the same as a flat grind, except the bevel doesn’t extend all the way to the spine. The Scandi Grind, along with the High Flat Grind, is more common today. I am personally more inclined towards a thin full flat grind for most tasks. For instance, we believe the scandi and convex grind to be perfect for woodwork and bushcraft purposes. I don't want to start a which is better debate. From top to bottom: full flat, high saber (flat), saber (flat), scandi. If you're not careful, it goes from a flat bevel to a convex bevel pretty quickly. A scandi grind is actually one large secondary edge, without any additional frills. Yes it is a great craft! For bushcraft and most other stuff though I prefer a true flat grind. Scandi is the best for wood carving, and is easier for some people to sharpen. Scandinavian or Scandi Grind: Arguably, the most traditional bushcraft knife blade grind. Enzo Bushcraft Knives with different blade grind and … All are versions of flat grinds. Scandinavian Grind style knives are hands down the king of bushcraft knife grinds because they are capable of doing numerous types cutting tasks efficiently. Thread starter battattack99; Start date Jul 9, 2015; B. battattack99 Tracker. Cancel Unsubscribe. Scandi. Instead, the sabre grind will typically only be ground to around the mid-way point on the blade. What is a scandi grind? Easy to maintain and slices like the dickens. It's a bit harder to sharpen due to the micro bevel. It then tapers in a straight line toward the edge. Takes longer to sharpen IMO. My hunting/skinning knife is a saber grind (Becker BK5) and my butchering knife is a flat grind (OKC Old Hickory Butcher). Can you point me to any resources? Well done chaps. I mean that any knife with sharp, flat, low angle, no secondary bevel cuts feather sticks well, "scandi grind" not required. My food knife/ pocket knife is a flat grind as well (SAK Tinkerer). Lets start with that, as a first notice those AGR pics do not show any secondary or micro bevels. This is where my inexperience with FFG's came out, I thought a full flat grind did not have a secondary bevel, I thought it was all one bevel. I have found it difficult to work out which scandi grinds are zero grinds and which are not. The Scandinavian grind, or Scandi grind, is a short flat (occasionally convex) grind on a thin blade where the primary grind is also the edge bevel. Initially, it doesn’t matter what kind of motion you apply, so long as the bevel stays flat. I like both. I liked my mora scandi so much thatijust bought a enzo trapper o1 scandi. Flat grinds are great for whittling and general use. yeah a full flat grind just means it goes all the way to the spine of the knife making the spine angle more acute than 90*. The scandi grind works well in the thinner, smaller blades. This means that you do not have a secondary edge bevel/grind at all; there is only the one primary grind which is ground to zero to make the edge, sometimes called a Zero Sabre Grind. The modern tactical and bushcraftmovements have brought heated debates on which grind is the best. Awesome! Yes I know scandi was a thing before the internet but it wasn't "omg no scandi grind on your knife? Joined Aug 26, 2012 Messages 193 Likes 2 Location WNY. For me. Sent from my SM-A705FN using Tapatalk Apologies! The pronounced bevel allows you to easily follow the edge in relation to the wood grain. A great fixed blade knife for bushcraft. The primary bevel continues to become the cutting edge, with no deviation or angle change. William Collins 31,103 views. The knife shown has hand-rubbed flats and satin finished bevels. Here a scandi grind on outdoor knives, hunting knives and bushcraft knives has been the standard for years. I like scandi's , just cause the secondary bevel on most (not all) doesn't work wood as well in my experience (with FFG is limited). By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. It is good of you all to take the trouble to educate me on these issues. Rant over. I had to google a saber grind, looks almost identical to a scandi. Handle material- We prefer micarta for our bushcraft knife handles. Zero ground is thinner at the edge, so it can be sharper, but more delicate. For strict wood carving/ bushcraft work I use a scandi (Mora Classic 1, or Garberg). They are durable and have a good grip when wet. Flat Grind VS Scandi Grind Published September 16, 2014 at 640 × 394 in A Bushcraft Knife Guide. A variety of different blade grinds come with me into the woods. You're already dead!". Lets start with that, as a first notice those AGR pics do not show any secondary or micro bevels. It seems that this weakness is due to improper tempering . That means much more of the blade is left the same thickness as the spine. so take it for what is is worth. ← Previous Next → Two Enzo Bushcraft Knives with differing blade grinds and wood handle materials. I mean that any knife with sharp, flat, low angle, no secondary bevel cuts feather sticks well, "scandi grind" not required. Bushcraft Carbon Black Scandi Grind Knife. Cuts circles around my Moras. Full flat grinds can often be found on Spyderco knives. Its a superb design, offering a great all round performance, an extremely popular knife in Europe its never been sold in Canada before. Some flat grinds are more like 3/4 of the height of the blade. Cookies help us deliver our Services. Problems with scandis rolling or chipping has. The scandi grind works well in the thinner, smaller blades. Depending on the thickness of the blade, this usually requires at least some secondary bevel. Thanks . With the right steel choice you can now get some very thin edges that do well when it comes to chipping and rolling.