Mature ‘Prairie Pride’ Common Hackberry. Rate: medium to fast. It prefers a deep moist soil, but is drought resistant on upland sites. Celtis occidentalis - American Hackberry. Celtis australis Southern nettle tree W.J. Growth Rate Medium. Attributes Deciduous Fall Color. In some instances, the bark is smooth enough on the limbs to resemble that of a beech tree. Round-headed to irregular; lower branches drooping. Glossy to dull green leaves (2 to 5 inches long) have mostly uneven leaf bases and are coarsely toothed from midleaf to tip. Well adapted for poor soils and other adverse growing conditions. Celtis occidentalis, commonly known as the common hackberry, is a large deciduous tree native to North America. Celtis occidentalis, or Hackberry, is found growing throughout the state. Prune out the clusters of twigs when practical. 1). Witches' broom is caused by a mite and powdery mildew. Witches' broom is caused by a mite and powdery mildew. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Celtis occidentalis, or Hackberry, is a deciduous tree, native to North Carolina, that commonly grows to 30 to 40 feet in height and 1 to 2 feet in diameter, but on the best sites, may reach a height of 130 feet and a diameter of 4 feet or more. Mature ‘Prairie Pride’ Common Hackberry. Foliage Color Green Yellow. Habitat: Found on … Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry Pronunciation. Celtis occidentalis, or Hackberry, is a deciduous tree, native to North Carolina, that commonly grows to 30 to 40 feet in height and 1 to 2 feet in diameter, but on the best sites, may reach a height of 130 feet and a diameter of 4 feet or more. The growth rate of this tree is medium to fast, and many trees have height increases of 13 to 24 inches per year. Both twigs and young branches are covered with small white lenticels. Celtis occidentalis. This cultivar is mostly resistant to witches' broom. Watch for lacebugs and scale. Celtis mississippiensis pumila (Pursh) Mack. Powdery mildew may coat the leaves with white powder. Originating from these beaks, is a pair of large brownish stigmata. Mature Size On favorable soils it may reach a height of 60 to 70 feet. The main symptom is clusters of twigs scattered throughout the tree crown. Fast. Growth Rate Medium. Ulmaceae. ‘Prairie Pride’ Common Hackberry1 Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2 INTRODUCTION The tree forms a rounded vase reaching a height of 40 to 50 feet, is a moderately-rapid grower (Fig. Longevity Greater than 150 years. Irradiation levels per species and growth rate in commercial zones. Habitat. Find Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) in Bozeman Helena Butte Billings Dillon Big Sky Montana MT at Cashman Nursery Current Hours: 8:30 am - 5:30 pm Monday through Saturday 10:00 am - … It out-competes and replaces native shrubs and trees (Agnote 2009). Celtis can tolerate wind, pollution, and a wide range of soil conditions, including wet, dry and poor soils. Growth Rate Medium. Cooperative Extension prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex (including pregnancy), disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, and veteran status. form a strategic partnership called N.C. Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) is one of our most common trees in Iowa. Cover is also provided for game birds, rabbits, and deer by the young stands. It typically thrives in Full to Partial Sun and has a 13-24 Inches growth rate per year. canina (Raf.) Low Maintenance. Lacking flamboyance and romantic associations, hackberries are like cinder blocks: eminently useful but stigmatized by default" (Jacobson). Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. 2 Culture. It is a moderately long-lived hardwood with a light-colored wood, yellowish gray to light brown with yellow streaks.. Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), is a widespread small to medium-size tree, known also as common hackberry, sugarberry, nettletree, beaverwood, north ern hackberry, and American hackberry.On good bot tom-land soils it grows fast and may live to 20 years. 1050]. Female flowers give way to an often abundant fruit crop of round fleshy berry-like drupes maturing to deep purple. The Hackberry Tree does well or is tolerant in Moist, Well-Drained Acidi It is most common on Celtis occidentalis. Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry Hackberry, Common. Soil Moisture Moist to Average Well-drained Average to Dry Soils. The branches can tend to droop. I have tried the flesh around the drupe, and it is very good. The leaves are oval to lance-shaped, resembling those of an elm but more pointed. Unlike most previously reported drupes, hackberry exhibited the greatest size increase in the first stage of development rather than the last stage. Fruits are fleshy, rounded drupes, yellow to orange-red to dark purple, 0.33" diameter. Landscape uses Naturalizing Specimen. Insignificant, mostly monoecious, greenish flowers appear in spring (April–May) with male flowers in clusters and female flowers solitary. Celtis occidentalis‘Prairie Pride’ Figure 1. Celtis australis Southern nettle tree W.J. It also provides cover and nesting for birds. Flowers are small and not showy, April-May. John E. Krajicek and Robert D. Williams. web interface by P.O. Mature Height: 60 ft Mature Spread: 55 ft Growth Habit: Round Growth Rate: Fast Light Preference: Sun Fall Color: Yellow Growth Zone: 5 Suitable Substitutions for Celtis occidentalis. Hackberry Celtis occidentalis The hackberry, while often forgotten by casual consumers, is commonly heralded by tree experts as “one tough tree.” Found on a wide range of soils east of the Rockies from southern Canada to Florida, these trees thrive in a broad span of temperatures and on sites that vary from 14 to 60" of annual rainfall. If you have any useful information about this plant, please leave a comment. It decays quickly when exposed to moisture. Hackberry. Genus. Does well as a street tree. It has a straight central trunk and an ovoid crown with a cylindrical shape once mature. Round-headed to irregular; lower branches drooping. Leaves Ovate, Green, Golden or Yellow or Orange, Deciduous. Core Characteristics Wisconsin Native: […] Mature Common Hackberry. The main symptom is clusters of twigs scattered throughout the tree crown. Ulmaceae -- Elm family. Celtis occidentalis Common hackberry Culture: Culture: This extremely adaptable tree is tolerant of a broad range of conditions from sandy to clay soils and acidic to slightly alkaline conditions. Growth Rate: Fast: Pollinators: Bees: Cultivation Status: Ornamental, Wild: Cultivation Details Celtis occidentalis can be very cold-hardy when growing in hot summer areas, able to tolerate winter temperatures falling to at least -20°c when dormant, though young growth in spring is very susceptble to frost damage[200. SEL-tis ok-si-den-TA-lis Pronunciation Audio. Partial Sun/Shade. In the non-coloured areas the plant is unlikely to establish as the climate, soil or landuse is not presently suitable. SEL-tis ok-si-den-TA-lis Pronunciation Audio. Family. It ripens in September, but often remains on the tree through the winter. Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) is one of our most common trees in Iowa. Celtis occidentalis is a deciduous Tree growing to 20 m (65ft) by 20 m (65ft) at a fast rate. Full Shade. Soil Moisture Moist to Average Well-drained Average to Dry Soils. Leaves are larger and more coarsely toothed, bark more warty, and upper leaf surface rougher than the regular hackberry. It is hardy to zone (UK) 2. Has separate male and female reproductive parts on the same tree (monoecious). Attributes Deciduous Fall Color. Nativity. Deep shade (Less than 2 hours to no direct sunlight), Full sun (6 or more hours of direct sunlight a day), Partial Shade (Direct sunlight only part of the day, 2-6 hours), 2a, 2b, 3a, 3b, 4b, 4a, 5b, 5a, 6b, 6a, 7b, 7a, 8a, 8b, 9b, 9a. native to Quebec & southwest to Oklahoma; zone 3; Habit and Form. Fraxinus pennsylvanica 'Marshall' Marshall's Seedless Ash. Celtis occidentalis 'Prairie Pride' - possesses a uniformly oval canopy, lustrous dark green thick foliage, stems that do not develop witches' broom, and low fruit set NOTES Translation. Plant Type: Deciduous, broadleaf, large tree. Habit Pyramidal Rounded. ‘Prairie Pride’ Common Hackberry1 Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2 INTRODUCTION The tree forms a rounded vase reaching a height of 40 to 50 feet, is a moderately-rapid grower (Fig. Growth Rate Growth is slow at first, but after a few years should average 12 to 18 inches annually. Mature Common Hackberry. - Fast growing shade tree that is well adapted to urban conditions. Attracts Birds. Has separate male and female reproductive parts on the same tree (monoecious). The database and code is licensed under a Growth form. It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen in October. Hackberry is a member of the elm family, but is a different genus. The main symptom is clusters of twigs scattered throughout the tree crown. Celtis occidentalis Ultra™ ('Ulzam') Characteristics. " Celtis are often rugged, handsome, deep-rooted shade trees afflicted by few serious pests. If you would like to support this site, please consider, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. It is also tolerant of urban conditions including soil compaction, air pollution and occasional flooding. Seeds can pose clean up problems if trees are sited near sidewalks or patios. Category: Trees; Hardiness Zone: 2-7; Height: 40-60 ft; Spread: 40-45 ft; Login To View Pricing. These will appear as summer adults from May-September, laying eggs that then develop into the winter adult form. Common Hackberry is a medium to large, wildlife-friendly deciduous tree. It can be sparsely found throughout the state, though not in the high mountains. Most common on Celtis occidentalis. The mature bark is light gray, rough and corky and the small fruit turns from orange red to Powdery mildew may coat the leaves with white powder. It will tolerate part shade, wind, and many urban pollutants, but does not do well with maritime exposure.The wood is heavy, rather soft and weak. Nativity. This tree is a U.S. native that is widely distributed throughout the east and midwest. Fraxinus pennsylvanica Cimmaron® ('Cimmzam') Cimmaron® Ash. “Invasive trees such as Celtis, are among the most damaging to the natural ecosystem, as a result of their ability to become structurally dominant.” (Agnote 2009). Growth rate of 12-24" per year. Celtis. For example, Celtis occidentalis grows well only at very high levels of irradiation exposure, whereas Fraxinus peensylvanica can tolerate around 200 hours less across a growing season. Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Celtis occidentalis Common name: Hackberry . Celtis occidentalis - American or Common Hackberry (Ulmaceae)-----Celtis occidentalis is a tough tree for urban or rural sites, growing rapidly to provide shade, windbreak, and/or erosion control under stressful conditions. Celtis occidentalis is a deciduous Tree growing to 20 m (65ft) by 20 m (65ft) at a fast rate. Celtis occidentalis. with help from Chicagoland Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis 'Chicagoland'): 50 feet high and 40 feet wide; a neat upright-oval habit of growth and a strong central leader, narrower than the species. Box 189 • Boring OR 97009 503-663-4128 • Fax 503-663-2121 Toll-Free 1-800-825-8202 www.jfschmidt.com Prairie Sentinel® Hackberry Celtis occidentalis ‘JFS-KSU1’ Zone: 4 Richard Morris. Growth Habit. Hackberry nipple gall also does not hurt the tree, but can disfigure the leaves. Central to southeast U.S. in river valleys and rich, upland slopes. Red= Very high: Orange = Medium: ... Normal growth rate? 2 Culture. The globular fruit is borne singly on stems 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch long. Habitat: Found on … Common Hackberry1 Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2 INTRODUCTION The tree forms a rounded vase reaching a height of 40 to 80 feet, is a rapid grower, and transplants easily (Fig. Symbol Scientific Name Other Common Names; CECA9: Celtis canina Raf. Birds readily consume the red to purple seeds in fall. Flower and Fruit Details. Native plant ... Hackberry’s growth rate is very fast in its youth and slows as it matures, but it should grow 20-25 feet in 10 years. Very adaptable tree, growing in wet and dry soils in full sun. Celtis occidentalis. Regardless of type, flowers are about ¼ inch across and predominately yellowish green; each flower has 4 to 5 oblong sepals connected together at the base. Celtis. Also a host plant for the American Snout, Mourning Cloak and Tawny Emperor butterflies. Today, Hackberry wood is used for furniture, in baskets and crates, and in some athletic equipment. Powdery mildew, leaf spot and root rot may occur. Birds consume the fruits and disperse the seeds. The birds relish the purplish-black fruit. It is common in Missouri where it typically occurs statewide in low woods along streams and in drier upland slopes (Steyemark). Height: 40-60ft Spread: 40-60ft Zone: 2-9 Exposure: Full sun to part shade Growth Rate: Moderate to fast Bloom Time/Color: N/A Fall Color: Yellow Uses: Shade tree, street tree Maintenance: Low Tree Shape: Round, vase Other: Edible fruit, interesting bark This plant supports Hackberry Emperor (Asterocampa celtis) and Question Mark Butterfly (Polygonia interrogationis) larvae. Ulmaceae. Ken Fern, This tree is a U.S. native that is widely distributed throughout the east and midwest. Fleshy parts of the fruit are edible and somewhat sweet. Genus. The name hackberry originated from the Scottish "hagberry" which in England was the common name bird cherry. Each drupe has one round brown seed within. Young twigs are usually glabrous, but sometimes they are pubescent. This plant was used for food, fuel and medicinal purposes by Native Americans. It is monoecious (separate male and female flowers on the same plant); the tiny, greenish flowers bloom in April-May. Most common on Celtis occidentalis. Life Expectancy of a Hackberry Tree. https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/celocc/all.html Moderate growth rate. NC State University and N.C. A&T State University work in tandem, along with federal, state and local governments, to Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis), is a widespread small to medium-size tree, known also as common hackberry, sugarberry, nettletree, beaverwood, north ern hackberry, and American hackberry.On good bot tom-land soils it grows fast and may live to 20 years. Leaves Ovate, Green, Golden or Yellow or Orange, Deciduous. Flowers Inconspicuous. Providing articles and resources on trees native to the Niagara Region Suitable Substitutions for Celtis occidentalis. Low Maintenance. Insects, Diseases, or Other Plant Problems: Witches’ broom (creating dwarfed, dense, contorted twig clusters at the branch ends) is somewhat common; while it does little harm to the tree, but can be quite unsightly. The mature bark is light gray, rough and corky and the Moderate growth rate. Bean, in his authoritative five volumes describing ‘Trees and Shrubs hardy in the British Isles’, reserves fairly harsh criticism for Celtis as a genus when he states ‘The nettle trees have no beauty of flower, these being small and greenish. It is also known as the nettletree, sugarberry, beaverwood, northern hackberry, and American hackberry. Witches' broom is caused by a mite and powdery mildew. Moderately deer resistant and immune to Dutch Elm disease. These trees can live 150 to 200 years. Average mature size of 40-60' tall and wide. Central to southeast U.S. in river valleys and rich, upland slopes. Celtis occidentalis Ultra™ ('Ulzam') Characteristics. Celtis occidentalis Figure 1. Celtis can tolerate wind, pollution, and a wide range of soil conditions, including wet, dry and poor soils. It has a straight central trunk and an ovoid crown with a cylindrical shape once mature. Flowers in Spring. Growth Rate Medium. Celtis occidentalis‘Prairie Pride’ Figure 1. Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry Hackberry, Common. Noteworthy Characteristics. Ajna Fern Ulmaceae -- Elm family. Fast growth rate (UCONN 2009). Magnifica Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis 'Magnifica'): 50 feet high and 40 feet wide; broadly oval to vase shaped It is most common on Celtis occidentalis. Trunk diameter ranges from 1-3 (less frequently to 4). The female flowers produce round, fleshy, dark purple, berry-like fruits valued by birds and wildlife as a food source. Powdery mildew may coat the leaves with white powder. Common Hackberry1 Edward F. Gilman and Dennis G. Watson2 INTRODUCTION The tree forms a rounded vase reaching a height of 40 to 80 feet, is a rapid grower, and transplants easily (Fig. Common Hackberry Celtis occidentalis Description & Overview Common Hackberry is a large, Wisconsin native shade tree with a vase shape canopy. Useful Temperate Plants Database 2016 by Brown, Orange or Purple Drupe, Small (0.25 - 0.50 inches), fruiting in Summer or Fall Edible. Attracts Birds. Partial Sun/Shade. Celtis occidentalis 'Prairie Pride' - possesses a uniformly oval canopy, lustrous dark green thick foliage, stems that do not develop witches' broom, and low fruit set NOTES T ranslation Celtis is the Greek name for the Hackberry tree (Hackberry itself is a derivative of the Scottish name Hagberry, which is actually a … Bean, in his authoritative five volumes describing ‘Trees and Shrubs hardy in the British Isles’, reserves fairly harsh criticism for Celtis as a genus when he states ‘The nettle trees have no beauty of flower, these being small and greenish. Celtis occidentalis is mostly associated with moist soils along streams in Wisconsin, north at least to the Peshtigo River in southern Marinette County, but uncommon or absent over the far northern counties. The leaves may be uniformly coated or only in patches. Category: Trees; Hardiness Zone: 2-7; Height: 40-60 ft; Spread: 40-45 ft; Login To View Pricing. Celtis occidentalis Common Hackberry Ulmaceae. Expand. This cultivar is mostly resistant to witches' broom. Mature gray bark develops corky ri… Celtis occidentalis - American or Common Hackberry (Ulmaceae)-----Celtis occidentalis is a tough tree for urban or rural sites, growing rapidly to provide shade, windbreak, and/or erosion control under stressful conditions.