The quieter moments of the album don’t feel as nocturnal as they did before, but Kaplan-led numbers like “The Ballad of Red Buckets” and “The Hour Grows Late,” or classic Hubley tunes “Pablo and Andrea” and “Don’t Say a Word (Hot Chicken #2)” wouldn’t feel out of place when paired with the blue hour. "Blue Line Swinger" is a frightening juggernaut of a song, starting slowly before building steadily into an epic freakout of earth-shaking proportions. The song on Electr-o-pura with the most quintessentially Yo La Tengo-esque story is the serene ballad “The Hour Grows Late.” A whispery Kaplan paints a scene not too distant from some that Yo La Tengo must’ve experienced in their earlier years. Five Years Later: The Best Films of 2013!! A year after Electr-o-pura, Yo La Tengo appeared, as the Velvet Underground, in the film I Shot Andy Warhol (they have self-deprecating stories about that, too). The Hoboken, New Jersey trio have been characteristically self-deprecating about the experience: Guitarist Ira Kaplan—who shares vocal duties with his wife, drummer Georgia Hubley, and the bassist, James McNew—remembers accidentally insulting the audience, who were none too taken with the band’s understated noise-pop. In my humble opinion, though, Yo La Tengo saved the best of "Electr-O-Pura" for last in the form of the nine-minute "Blue Line Swinger," which has quickly become one of my favorite tunes of all time. James gets up and watches mourning birds with Abraham (Wednesday) 4. In between, the songs engage in a dialogue with other music that’s like an intimate conversation by other means. The former is the first of two songs on the album, that pun simultaneously on Flying Burrito Brothers song titles and the prime culinary offering of Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville, where Yo La Tengo were recording for the first time. In a Beautiful Place Out in the Country Turns 20, Interview: Peter Garrett from Midnight Oil, Interview: Joseph D’Agostino of Empty Country, Elvis Costello: The Complete Armed Forces, Resequence: Smashing Pumpkins: Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, Resequence: Chance the Rapper: The Big Day, Rediscover: Lords of the New Church: Killer Lords, Rediscover: T2: It’ll All Work Out in Boomland, Holy Hell! Fittingly, it’s the first Yo La Tengo album with all three members identified as co-songwriters. Most importantly, though, Kaplan himself didn’t actually know much about these old movies—Hubley, the daughter of two professional animators, was the film obsessive. Released in May 1995, about 11 years after the band formed, Electr-o-pura was their seventh album. If you’re willing to hear yet another version of “Auld Lang Syne,” Hark! The 25th anniversary edition of the 1995 record from the iconic alternative-indie group Yo La Tengo.Packaged in a gatefold sleeve and cut from the original 58-minute master. Yo La Tengo found lightning in a bottle with Painful, an album that made use of their newfound synergy to establish the aesthetic that they’d perfect over the following decade – nocturnal, but never sleepy, with enough addicting guitar noise for the rock heads to lap up giddily, all sewn together seamlessly enough that they could get away with having two completely different versions of “Big Day Coming” without it seeming garish. After the noisy but dream-like drift of Painful, Electr-O-Pura found Yo La Tengo in livelier and more outwardly enthusiastic form; while they had hardly abandoned their more subdued and contemplative side, as evidenced by the lovely "The Hour Grows Late" and "Pablo and Andrea," they seemed eager to once again explore the grittier textures they'd unearthed on President Yo La Tengo and May I Sing … Catch up every Saturday with 10 of our best-reviewed albums of the week. There’s even a thrill of danger in his voice as he blurts, “Let’s jump the ship/Let’s cut out.” Why not? Yo La Tengo (often abbreviated as YLT, Spanish for "I Have It") is an American indie rock band formed in Hoboken, New Jersey in 1984. Emboldened by all this familiarity, the band tore into their emerging signature style—woozy folk-pop ballads, feedback-streaked guitar jams, organ swells, plenty of ba-ba-bas—with shrugging audacity. Bless the crooked road that led James McNew into the loving embrace of Yo La Tengo. If they were experiencing any growing pains, it doesn’t show, even in half-formed jams like “Paul Is Dead” or the penultimate noise barrage “Attack on Love,” or even “False Ending,” which doesn’t even pass the minute mark. “Out of the darkness you will come around,” she assures, “and I’ll find you there.” The song is proof. Five Years Later: The Best Films of 2014!! Bless the crooked road that led James McNew into the loving embrace of Yo La Tengo. Yo La Tengo are the next in line for Matador's ongoing "Revisionist History" reissues. Live at Maxwell's in Hoboken, NJ, on the 8th night of Hanukkah, 2011. Wonderful album, wonderful pressing. Electr-o-pura lives up to that standard, whether in alternate takes or subsequent re-recordings. "Blue Line Swinger" is a frightening juggernaut of a song, starting slowly before building steadily into an epic freakout of earth-shaking proportions. And it still sounds low-key monumental, like the work of a group that might share a bill at the Mercury Lounge with a reanimated Fab Four. The album received very positive reviews from music critics. Released 2 May 1995 on Matador (catalog no. In terms of their discography, Electr-o-pura is always going to have the short end of the stick. A musician packs up his drum machine and, gradually, his guitar, peeking out at empty seats, clock ticking. No strangers to lengthy instrumental passages, here they stretch out for nine-plus drum-heavy minutes of whammy-bar mangling and organ rushes, as Hubley seems to address a lover gnawed by depression and self-doubt. The album takes a darker, heavier turn on the very Sonic Youth-like Flying Lesson, Kaplan seriously… Electr-o-pura, currently being given a reboot of sorts by longtime label Matador, occupies a place in Yo La Tengo’s discography that was rarefied before and seems almost impossible now. Pitchfork is the most trusted voice in music. It was Yo La Tengo’s second album on the upstart label Matador, and second album with producer Roger Moutenot, who would go on to oversee all of the group’s following albums until 2013’s Fade. Electr-o-Pura, an Album by Yo La Tengo. Kaplan sings that he wants to send this song out to someone called Richie Van “in his thrift store corner of the world.” It’s a nod toward an amazingly obscure singer, whose equally obscure record—a thrift-store score for Kaplan—inspired Yo La Tengo to cover the future Gilmore Girls soundtrack highlight “My Little Corner of the World” a couple of years later. Get a low price and free shipping on thousands of items. …, A titanic work that runs just under 40 minutes and is frightening in its originality …, Chock full of attitude, fun and menace, Shygirl’s latest establishes a new, larger-than-li…, Supergroup shows the youngins how it’s done …, Criminally Overrated: 2001: A Space Odyssey. Unlike the albums immediately before and after it, Electr-o-pura doesn’t represent a gigantic leap, just a great band lurching headlong into its own. Georgia thinks it's probably okay (Tuesday) 3. Release Date: 4th September 2020 Continuing with their ever-expanding Revisionist History series, Matador Records announce a 25th anniversary reissue of Yo La Tengo’s 1995 album Electr-o-pura. Your email address will not be published. It took the Hoboken three-piece 13 bassists in seven years to find the perfect fit, but it speaks to the impact McNew had on the band that their first album with him as a full-time member, 1993’s Painful, is regarded as one of the band’s most unimpeachable albums to this day. Now, newly reissued on vinyl, the pop-focused and densely referential album remains a monument in the band’s catalog. Sorry.) It took the Hoboken three-piece 13 bassists in seven years to find the perfect fit, but it speaks to the impact McNew had on the band that their first album with him as a full-time member, 1993’s Painful, is regarded as one of the band’s most unimpeachable albums to this day. On “False Alarm,” Kaplan refers to McNew by name and mentions the title of a song tucked away deeper on the album, “(Straight Down to the) Bitter End.” That one is Hubley-led fuzz-pop, a caustic character study that features the evocative line, “The stars that shine but don’t belong to you.” Yo La Tengo shone while walking among us. In a very Yo La Tengo move, all the songs were picked in collaboration with Japanese visual artist Yoshitomo Nara to form part of a limited-edition catalog for his Los Angeles … Electr-O-Pura is the seventh studio album by American indie rock band Yo La Tengo, released on May 2, 1995 by record label Matador. “Everything’s gotta be rebooted these days,” Kaplan said from his and Hubley’s home in a recent retrospective, discussing a 25-year-old music video that enacts a similar juxtaposition. (Cuts out at 10:25 mark. In my humble opinion, though, Yo La Tengo saved the best of "Electr-O-Pura" for last in the form of the nine-minute "Blue Line Swinger," which has quickly become one of my favorite tunes of all time. by Elise Barbin (@elisecbarb)Imagine the platonic ideal of the art making practice and a vision of Yo La Tengo materializes swiftly. The opening “Decora,” where Hubley begins with a nonchalant murmur of, “I see you crawling across the floor,” picks up from the flickering dream-pop of Painful; the way that Hubley bends syllables and moans the title phrase on the chorus recalls My Bloody Valentine’s wavy “glide guitar” technique. Songs like those would be worthy of the trash bin of lesser bands, but with Yo La Tengo, those moments only add to the charm – and when listened next to the similarly “anything goes” attitude of I Can Hear the Heart, you can see the way the band would grow to operate being born. See how this album was rated and reviewed by the users of AoTY.org. In the video looking back at “Tom Courtenay,” Kaplan, who is wearing a black band T-shirt, jokes about how he still dresses the same all these years later. “It was another way of writing about and to Georgia,” Kaplan has said. Music Reviews: Electr-O-Pura by Yo La Tengo released in 1995 via Matador. The cookie is used to personalize your user experience and with accordance to our privacy policy: is a worthy addit…, After 30 years in the game, Yo La Tengo shows that even recordings of them noodling aimles…, How do you follow up a classic? The name-dropping of British Invasion-era movie stars also fits into the concept of this band of dedicated fans (Kaplan, as is often noted, was formerly a music critic for New York Rocker and Village Voice) cosplaying their way into the big show. But Electr-o-pura was also the second in a nearly impeccable four-album run that began with 1993’s noise-pop gauntlet Painful, peaked with 1997’s expansively intimate I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One, and then slipped away into the moonlit hush of 2000’s And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out. But there’s self-aware humor, too. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Yo La Tengo We Have Amnesia Sometimes, released 17 July 2020 1. Painful was an exceptionally hard act to follow – which it did, admirably, but we’ll get to that in a moment – but two years later they’d release I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One, yet another untouchable masterwork. Genres: Indie Rock, Noise Pop. Now in a gatefold sleeve and cut from the original 58-minute master, the new reissue is pressed for the first time on two LPs t It’s indie rock at its most epically beautiful. Yo La Tengo’s vision of a welcoming, everyday bohemianism has gone in and out of fashion, but it was never exactly trendy. “It’s not the first time you’ll take a fall,” Hubley warns, memorably adding, “Act like you’ve never seen double before.” The closing “Blue Line Swinger,” also sung by Hubley, is one of Yo La Tengo’s very best songs. A similar tinge of downtown disquiet runs through the guitar workout of “Flying Lesson (Hot Chicken #1)” and the clanging, organ-blasted “False Alarm” . Electr-O-Pura is the seventh studio album by American indie rock band Yo La Tengo, released on May 2, 1995 by record label Matador. (By the way, those incongruous comments about the songs were lifted from an obscure book on the Blues Project , and don't trust those timings on the back cover -- they're deliberately inaccurate.) Few bands have consistently better ideas than Yo La Tengo, and they make 14 of them work like a charm on Electr-O-Pura. After “Tom Courtenay” fades out, “False Ending” fades in, with a raucous clamor akin to the infamous “I buried Paul” section tacked on as the fake-out conclusion of “Strawberry Fields Forever.” A couple of tracks later, though, “Paul Is Dead” recalls not so much the Beatles as the subway strut of the Velvet Underground and the sunshine harmonies of the Beach Boys, while Kaplan deadpans about a guy who’s singing along to the Rolling Stones song blasting in his headphones (“Sympathy for the Devil,” judging by the “woo, woo!”). Georgia considers the two blue ones (Thursday) 5. Opened up to an audience, the couple’s shared secrets and inside jokes could signal not exclusivity, but personal connection, ultimately fostering a community of fellow fans. Those are some pretty huge shoes to fill, but it didn’t stop them, and two years later, they returned with Electr-o-pura, the next step in their progress in becoming one of the greatest rock bands in the universe. And that’s why Electr-o-pura shouldn’t be discounted or ignored as the awkward middle child: it was the training ground that gave Yo La Tengo the ability to make I Can Hear the Heart in the first place. Yo La Tengo wouldn’t crack the Billboard 200 album charts until the 2000s. On Electr-o-pura, Yo La Tengo were poised in between finding themselves and going their own way, and the end result is still exhilarating. The only area people could possibly complain about here is length - the last two records were rather tight at 11 tracks while this one is overlong at 14. OLE-132 / 92550-2; CD). Yo La Tengo’s inscrutable references and humor (purposefully, about half of the song times listed on the back cover are roughly accurate, while the other half are way off) and catalogue knowledge don’t interfere with what’s heartfelt. On Electr-o-pura, Yo La Tengo were poised in between finding themselves and going their own way, and the end result is still exhilarating. The Moon & Antarctica Turns 20, Holy Hell! Shadow of the Vampire Turns 20, From the Vaults of Streaming Hell: Death House, From the Vaults of Streaming Hell: Santa Jaws, From the Vaults of Streaming Hell: Stalked By My Doctor: The Return, From the Vaults of Streaming Hell: Deadcon, The Ministry for the Future: by Kim Stanley Robinson, The Irish Buddhist: by Alicia Turner, Laurence Cox, Brian Bocking. Go listen. On their seventh studio album, Yo La Tengo further expanded on the depth of their songwriting and ventured further out into their explorations of contrasting textures, moods, and atmospherics. Back then, they were just moderately successful enough to lose to Pavement at ping-pong on the Lollapalooza tour, headlined by Hole and Sonic Youth. They could make not only the brooding songs like “Flying Lessons (Hot Chicken #1),” where the bass patience of McNew dances with the hushed voice of Kaplan, but could do so alongside songs like the guitar-heavy jam “Decora” (lead by drummer/singer/wife Georgia Hubley), the noisy, weird “False Alarm,” or the timeless “Tom Courtenay,” which may be the closest the band have come to writing the perfect rock song. On “My Heart’s Reflection,” simmering with barely suppressed tension, Kaplan repurposes the central conceit of “I’ll Be Your Mirror” as he suggests, with disarming vulnerability, that he and a lover dress up as each other, locking the room and throwing away the key. Intergalactic signals introduce Here To Fall, a cross between a jazzy orchestral jam, a Cream-like melody (replete with "wah-wah" solo) and a thick syncopated rhythm. So it was a long time coming, maybe unthinkably long, given their modest popularity, in this era of streaming’s short-attention-span economies of scale. The best reason for being intensely protective about privacy is to enjoy it. Genre: Indie Rock. 1997’s I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One by Yo La Tengo …, After nearly 35 years together, the stalwart indie vets miraculously play like they’ve sti…, Hot, Wet & Sassy is a perfectly passable, but not groundbreaking, glimpse into Tobacco’s w…, Brock is remarkably adept at capturing how manic depression feels and moves. It’s no spoiler to say that the gig doesn’t quite pan out as hoped. In the fall of 1994, Yo La Tengo spent three nights opening for Johnny Cash, then at the cusp of a resurgence with his Rick Rubin-produced American Recordings. It’s a fitting closer for Electr-o-pura, which may not be perfect, but is still a remarkable snapshot of a band on the cusp of performing dozens more tricks just as dazzling, and somehow, even more effortless. The rest of Electr-o-pura doesn’t always stick in your head as quickly, but it’s often as rewarding. It all comes to a splendorous finale with “Blue Line Swinger,” a sublime climax that showcases the talents of the trio in one nearly 10-minute package. Sign up for the 10 to Hear newsletter here. Dacus’ stark “Tom Courtenay” cover brings to mind Yo La Tengo’s acoustic, Hubley-led rendition from a 1995 B-side, which sounds like Camera Obscura and might be better than the album version. The reissue rightfully concentrates on the proper LP only, now pressed for the first time across two vinyl records. Tally up 36 years under the belt of consummate music making (28 with the current lineup), Georgia Hubley, Ira Kaplan and James McNew outdo just about any contender on the axes of longevity, quality, and consistency. For a long, long time there was no such thing as a bad or even a passable Yo La Tengo album - everything they touched was excellent. Electr-O-Pura is the seventh studio album by American indie rock band Yo La Tengo, originally released in May 1995 via Matador Records.. Yo La Tengo (often abbreviated as YLT) formed in New Jersey in 1984. On their seventh studio album, Yo La Tengo would further expand on the venturous songwriting established on their previous album Painful with stunning craft and a deepened exploration of contrasting textures, moods and atmospherics. Between the Buried and Me: The Silent Circus, Bargain Bin Babylon: Earth, Wind & Fire: All ‘n All, Bargain Bin Babylon: Henry “Buzz” Glass: Square Dance Variations Volume I, Bargain Bin Babylon: Robert Cray: Strong Persuader, Bargain Bin Babylon: Lemon Jelly: Lost Horizons, Discography: David Bowie: Black Tie White Noise, Holy Hell! "Chock full with moments of pop gold like “Tom Courtenay,”melancholic ballads such as the heartbreaking “Pablo And Andrea,” and sweeping, … On May 2, 1995, two events that would prove to be noteworthy parts of indie music history happened: Yo La Tengo released their album Electr-o-pura, … 1995's 'Electr-O-Pura' nestled between two of their best albums in 'Painful' and 'I Can Hear The Heart Beating As One', and 'Electr-O-Pura' itself is no slouch either. Johnny Cash’s American Recordings-era audiences may have been irritated, but after Electr-o-pura hit shelves, Yo La Tengo started covering Grand Funk Railroad’s “We’re an American Band” during encores. In 1995, the indie rock trio lurched headlong into its own sound with Electr-O-Pura. At the most superficial level, this beloved live-show staple is one of the band’s uptempo fuzz-pop songs, like Painful’s “From a Motel 6” or I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One’s “Sugarcube,” and probably their catchiest. James and Ira demonstrate mysticism and some confusion holds (Monday) 2. Yo La Tengo’s second EP in recent months finds them resuming their covers jukebox niche, weaving together selections as unlikely as a 1940s blues oddity and as recognizable as a Bob Dylan classic. Existing between two classics can be a difficult way to be, but overlooking Electr-o-pura is, flat out, a huge mistake. Shipping to arrive around September 4, 2020. (By the way, those incongruous comments about the songs were lifted from an obscure book on the Blues Project, and don't trust those timings on the back cover -- … ReJack101: Don't read this drivel. Contrary to most 90s indie vinyl, not too expensive on the secondary market either. Since 1992 the lineup has consisted of Ira Kaplan (guitars, piano, vocals), Georgia Hubley (drums, piano, vocals), and James McNew (bass, vocals). Continuing with their ever-expanding Revisionist History series, Matador Records announce a 25 th anniversary reissue of Yo La Tengo’s 1995 album Electr-o-pura.Now in a gatefold sleeve and cut from the original 58-minute master, the new reissue is pressed for the first time on two LPs to ensure the highest quality of audio the album has … With 1995’s Electr-o-pura, Yo La Tengo hit their creative stride and remains one of the best albums the band has released in their long and productive career. Few bands have consistently better ideas than Yo La Tengo, and they make 14 of them work like a charm on Electr-O-Pura. On behalf of Beggars Group, Feature.fm sets cookies that can identify you as a visitor. Truly, it’s the best showcase of the individual strengths of each member, both unhinged and somehow equally restrained in the music they’re making, a magic trick played by one of the strongest power trios in all of indie rock. Yo La Tengo - ELECTR-O-PURA (25th Anniversary) - Matador - Double LP: £18.99. The band knows this – in at least one interview, singer/guitarist Ira Kaplan insinuated that anyone who said that one of the band’s first four albums was their favorite was lying. Rated #103 in the best albums of 1995, and #3319 of all-time album.. If the pre-reboot High Fidelity, originally published the same year as Electr-o-pura’s release, exhibited toxic masculinity and the misbegotten belief that what you like matters more than what you are like, Yo La Tengo offer the possibility of a more coequal relationship between romantic partners—and one where what you like matters because you, generally, like each other. Looking Back: Yo La Tengo - Electr-O-Pura This album is being reissued on September 4th Yo La Tengo open 1995's Electr-O-Pura with the familiar Velvet-y groove of Decora, Georgia Hubley's ghostly vocals combining well with Ira Kaplan's guitar work. While the beverage museum that prompted the album’s title (Electropura was a brand of purified water) was eventually donated to Goodwill), Yo La Tengo have continued to put out several mostly strong albums, along with film scores and other instrumentals. “I try not to hide what is true,” Kaplan sings, and it’s like an artist’s statement. Directed by Yo La Tengo’s then-roadie Phil Morrison, who went on to helm the breakout 2005 indie movie Junebug, the 1995 clip for “Tom Courtenay” imagines the band being asked to open for a fantastical reunion of the Beatles. The second verse shifts dramatically toward the personal, as Kaplan describes a drunken first meeting that grows into something more, then recognizes the impossibility of ever fully understanding another human being, even those we know best. “Tom Courtenay,” again, illustrates why Electr-o-pura and Yo La Tengo have stood the test of time. Johnny Cash’s American Recordings -era audiences may have been irritated, but after Electr-o-pura hit shelves, Yo La Tengo started covering Grand Funk Railroad’s “We’re an American Band” during encores. With it, the band gave themselves permission to be several different bands all at once. Yo La Tengo wouldn’t crack the Billboard 200 album charts until the 2000s. Electr-o-pura attracted the group’s normal glowing reviews, but it sold less than Painful. For this reissue—part of Matador’s Revisionist History series, which also includes Mary Timony’s Mountains, Pavement’s Wowee Zowee, and Guided By Voices’ Alien Lanes—Yo La Tengo labelmate Lucy Dacus reminisced fondly about discovering Electr-o-pura, with its CD packaging that intentionally messed up the track times (purportedly because reviewers kept singling out the longest songs on the band’s albums as the worst!).